Category Archives: Politics

Unsurprisingly, Patty Murray reveals herself as a shameless partisan hack

Of course we all know that Senator Patty Murray is a shameless partisan hack, so it’s no surprise when she confirms it as she did today on Twitter.

2017-03-24

In case you’re wondering why this is such a first-rate example of her ideology of party over country, consider the fact that when George W. Bush nominated Gorsuch to the federal bench in 2006, he was considered so non-controversial that he was confirmed by a unanimous voice vote of those present, including Patty Murray.

So much for playing politics instead of considering the good of the country.

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The Liar of Benghazi lectures Trump on the virtues of truthfulness

The headline says it all, really.

susan rice

The Liar of Benghazi

One can never hope to understand exactly why the Washington Post chose to run a Susan Rice op-ed about the national security consequences of presidential deceit. It’s not that I disagree with the points she makes; it’s the hypocrisy, the utter lack of self-awareness, the unmitigated mendacity of a brazen liar presuming to tell the rest of us that, yes, on second thought, lying is bad after all.

It’s the casual assumption of the Left that the public is too stupid to remember that Rice lied on command for Barack Obama or to even know who she is. It’s the tacit admission that they don’t care if people do remember the way she lied multiple times to our faces about the Benghazi attacks.

What further sign to we need that the Democrat party is in complete disarray than that they have to trot out Susan Rice to speak to integrity issues. Sad.


(BTW, with all due respect to the British, whom I love like brothers and sisters, I’m not willing to take at face value, as Rice apparently does – or pretends to do; it’s hard to know for sure because she’s a liar, the statement from their intelligence agency, GCHQ, that they did not surveil Candidate Trump at the behest of the former president.)

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Is that a threat?

Because it kinda-sorta sounds like a threat to me.

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Don’t be surprised when a young person says something that makes them sound young

I don’t hold 24-year-olds’ youth against them, but at the same time, I’m not surprised when they say something that sounds, well, immature and uninformed. This is the reason that it’s often disappointing when a young person is put in a position to represent or speak for others. Tomi Lahren makes a good case against pushing them into the conservative limelight.

Here’s what she said:

I’m pro choice, and here’s why. I am a constitutional, y’know, someone that loves the Constitution. I’m someone that’s for limited government. So I can’t sit here and be a hypocrite and say I’m for limited government but I think the government should decide what women do with their bodies. I can sit here and say that, as a Republican and I can say, you know what, I’m for limited government, so stay out of my guns, and you can stay out of my body as well…

Let me just start by saying, a “constitutional?” Really? In my English language, “constitutional” is an adjective, unless one is referring to a walk taken to improve one’s health.

Putting that aside, Lahren has, in the past, posted tweets that would lead one to believe she considers an unborn baby to have human rights.

Ms. Lahren has fallen into the indefensible trap of saying, “I think a fetus is a human being, but who am I to say that other women can’t kill their own babies?” Then she inexplicably ties her reasoning to federalism. Not content to stop there, she notes that anyone who doesn’t ascribe to her imbecilic line of thought is hypocritical. She may be surprised to know that millions of people nationwide have managed to find a way to be both pro-life and pro-federalism.

Imagine that.

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Dear Paul Ryan

Paul – can I call you Paul? – it’s a good thing you’re such a likeable guy; otherwise, I could really get to loathe you. For the past several years, you’ve been talking about repealing the Affordable Care Act. Silly me, I thought you had a plan. Instead, you introduced ACA-Lite and what a disappointment that turned out to be.

I feel like you were just stringing me along and then jilted me at the altar.

jilted-bride

Being in denial, and what jilted bride isn’t, I watched your infomercial. You know, the one with the whiteboard? I like the way you rolled up your sleeves, to show how you were really getting down to work.

paul ryan infomercial

Let’s just say I remain unconvinced. Maybe the Continuous Health Insurance Coverage Incentive sounds good to you, but it sure sounds an awful lot like the Individual Shared Responsibility Payment. Maybe tax credits really are better than subsidized premiums, but not being all policy-wonkish, I’m not seeing it. It all sounds like spreading the wealth around to me.

And what was that all about when you said, “This is the closest we will ever get to repealing and replacing Obamacare?” I’ve heard something like that before…let me think…Right, I’ve got it. It was at the used car dealership, when the smarmy sales guy told me that if I went to pee, the deal was off the table.

Here’s the thing, Paul. I want to believe that AHCA is an improvement over ACA, but I haven’t found anyone yet who can explain to me why it’s better. And, let me tell you, the CBO report didn’t help you out any, despite their dubious credibility.

smarmy car salesmanYour “Three Phase Plan” isn’t fooling anyone, either. “We have to pass the plan in order to find out…” Oh, wait. That was a different plan. It kind of has the same feel, though. “We have to pass this steaming pile of crap in order to get to the good stuff.” Okay, sure. I suppose Tom Price can be trusted to hold up his end of the deal, but tell me this: If you have to pass Phase 1 through reconciliation because you don’t have the votes, how do you propose to pass the legislation of Phase 3? I don’t see how that works.

So, Paul, to sell me – and probably millions of other conservatives like me – you either need to be able to explain the “benefits” of your plan in language that I can understand or you need to toss the whole thing in the trash and start over. At this point, I prefer the latter.

Love,

Me

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Only because government is too big

Why do people care so passionately about politics these days? When I was a child in the ’60s, my parents didn’t seem to care much about politics and neither did any of their friends. To this day I have no idea what my parents’ political views were, because they never talked politics, but I guarantee you that all my daughters are aware of my views. Well aware. Why are people now willing break off friendships and disown family members over political candidates?

A poll released by the APA in February found that over half of the respondents indicated that the political climate was a source of stress.

David Wasserman, writing at FiveThirtyEight, opines about the the death of purple America, those areas where political contests are decided by single-digit margins, but doesn’t speculate as to why. He concludes:

In an increasing number of communities like Baldwin County, Alabama, which gave Trump 80 percent of its major-party votes, and San Mateo, California, which gave Clinton 80 percent, an entire generation of youth will grow up without much exposure to alternative political points of view. If you think our political climate is toxic now, think for a moment about how nasty politics could be 20 or 30 years from now.

There’s a simple answer: Government is too big.

government is too big political cartoons

Take the case of Melissa and Aaron Klein. If those names don’t sound familiar, would it help if I had just called them the Oregon bakers? I’m guessing it would. Or how about the Kennewick, Washington, florist, Baronelle Stutzman? In both cases, Christian small business owners exercising their right to freedom of religion found themselves at odds with the government. The government may pay lip service to freedom of religion, but in practice, it’s treated as freedom of worship, so please keep your icky religion inside the four walls of your church where it belongs, thank you very much.

Property owners aren’t faring any better. Back in 2015, we heard about Andy and Katie Johnson, a Wyoming couple who built a pond on their 8-acre farm. Even though the pond became a haven for wildlife, the EPA found them to be in violation of a water rule that claims authority over every drop of water in the country. Have a puddle on your property? Yep, theirs. At the time this story broke, the Johnsons had been fined over $16 million. To sum that up, EPA  bureaucrats wrote a rule giving themselves the authority to ruin a farmer for improving his property.

Mike and Chantell Sackett found themselves in a similar situation with the EPA, except in their case they meddled with a wetland rather than creating one. Does is seem as though property owners just can’t win?

Gun and ConstitutionThe assault on 2nd Amendment rights is never-ending. I’m sure that gun control advocates keep hammering away in the hope that everyone else will cede their rights just to shut them up. Here in Washington State, every legislative session sees the introduction of new and varied gun control bills. And when the proposed legislation is so far out there that it can’t even pass out of committee, someone writes it up as an initiative and puts it on the ballot, confident that King County will bring home the win. It’s now possible in Washington to be stripped of your right to own firearms before you’re even aware any action has been taken against you.

The number of federal regulations is growing at truly astonishing rate and along with it, as Glenn Reynolds tells us, is the number of regulatory crimes. There’s no way for individuals to avoid running afoul of them because, as Reynolds points out, they’re often counter-intuitive.

Government at every level has intruded into our daily lives to such an extent that it’s no longer possible to adopt the casual apathy of my parents. Bureaucrats are like party crashers at a wedding reception. No one knows who they are or where they came from, but there they are, eating up your life savings and telling you that you should have done things differently or believed differently or understood your rights differently.

Politics has morphed into a high stakes game. When the government is big enough to ruin your business, devalue your property, bankrupt you or deprive you of your clearly stated constitutional rights, it’s no wonder people are passionate.


Thanks to Jon Gabriel for getting my thought process moving on this post.

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Are you as conservative as you think you are?

3D man near red question markIf you’re okay with a 30% premium penalty for not maintaining continuous health care insurance coverage, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

If you think it’s a-okay to have to report your health insurance information to the IRS, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

If you agree that money isn’t fungible after all, as long as the House GOP says it’s not, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

If you’re down with the government deciding which insurance plans can be offered, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

If you think Health Savings Accounts are the perfect one-size-fits-all solution to all our health care insurance needs, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

If you’re cool with having the government boot on your health care, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.

So overall, if you think the House GOP “repeal and replace”plan is better than Obamacare, you may not be as conservative as you think you are.


Thanks to my friend, Brandon, for his contributions to this post.

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