P.S. (Or, More About Lisa Brown)

It’s come to my attention that Lisa Brown objects to being called “Liberal Lisa.”

liberal lisa whiner baby

Leaving that aside for a moment, this tweet is so unfair and so calculatedly misleading that I was left momentarily speechless when I first saw it. At a glance, a person could be forgiven for believing that Cathy McMorris Rodgers had referenced “Sleepy Joe Biden” and “Pocahontas” Liz Warren. Herself. Like actually said those words. Which is laughable, but exactly the impression that Brown wanted to leave with people.

Now that I’ve got that out of my system, let’s get back to Brown’s complaint about being called “Liberal Lisa.” I’m sure that she’s worried about voters outside her “Downtown” constituency finding out about her liberal predilections, but I’m confused as to why she considers it an insult to be called, rightfully, liberal. (God knows she’s no conservative.) Maybe she’d prefer “Leftist Lisa,” or “Progressive Lisa.”

After yesterday’s post, I’m leaning towards “Lying Lisa.”

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Lisa Brown: Letting Others Collect Tainted Money for Her

LISA_BROWN.JPG_t1200I don’t particularly care if politicians take money from corporations; my feeling is that corporations have a right to protect their interests. But it appears to be a big, freaking deal to Democrat Lisa Brown. Enough so that she made a scary “dark money” video for her campaign, criticizing her opponent, Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, for accepting money from Paul Ryan’s PAC and declaring that she doesn’t take corporate PAC money. Period.

But is that really true? The answer is…not so much.

For example, Brown’s campaign received $5,000 from Nancy Pelosi’s PAC to the Future. PAC to the Future has accepted donations from numerous corporate PACs, including (but not limited to):

  • Amgen
  • Burlington Northern
  • Lowe’s
  • New York Life
  • Microsoft
  • Google
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Mednax
  • AFLAC
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Torchmark

She’s also received a $1,000 donation from the New Democrat Coalition PAC, which has received donations from various corporations, including:

  • Walmart
  • Cardinal Health
  • Metlife
  • Humana
  • Molina Healthcare
  • Target
  • New York Life
  • And so on…

I could go on, because of the 39 PACs that have made donations to her campaign, at least 15 have accepted money from corporate PACs. And that, according to Lisa, is “exactly what’s wrong with this Congress.”

that's what's wrong with congress lisa brown

Like I said, I don’t particularly care if Lisa Brown accepts money from corporate PACs. But I care if she lies about it, which she clearly is. And she thinks WA-05 voters are too stupid to notice.

If she’s willing to lie about where her campaign cash is coming from in order to get elected, what would she be willing to lie about if she were elected?

This is what Brown needs to remember. Money is fungible. Money from a tainted source is tainted money.

And we’re not that stupid.

 

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Forcing Girls to Compete Against Boys Is a Biological Outrage

Indulge me while I share a personal story.

My youngest daughter started swim lessons just after she turned six and spent two full sessions (in other words, 20 swim lessons) sitting on the side of the pool. Yep, that’s right. She wouldn’t even get in the water, much less put her face in it. Thankfully, her third class was taught by an extremely gifted and understanding teenager, Janelle, who, by the end of two weeks, had her in the water and dunking her face.

Two more sessions with Janelle and she was swimming with her face in the water, learning alternate side breathing, and backstroke. Because of my former life as a swim coach’s wife, it was obvious to me from the first stroke she took on her back that she had a natural feel for the water.

By the time she was eight, I felt she was ready for more than lessons and she joined the local age group swim team. From the start, she displayed an exceptional work ethic and did well, despite the distinct disadvantage of being, well, short (more on this later).

Now about the same time my daughter joined swim team, there was a boy, who I’ll call David (NOT his real name) who also joined. He was tall for his age, but didn’t work at it especially hard. Or hard at all, really. When I say that, I mean there was a lot of goofing off and cheating on time intervals in practice. I don’t mean this is a bad way; he was a little boy and acted accordingly. Despite his lack of effort, for either conditioning or improving his strokes, he also did reasonably well, although for several years, due to her hard work and natural talent, my daughter could beat him in many races.

Fast forward to their teen years…my daughter was still working hard, and her hard work paid off with state meet qualifications. David was still goofing off in practice and his strokes were still – how can I say this delicately – total crap, but he could easily beat my daughter – and every other girl on the swim team – in sprint events, and even some of the longer events. He was 6’4″ tall and had the advantage of some voodoo physics involving the relative drag exerted on long as opposed to short bodies in the water. His other advantages included:

  • a larger heart and lungs in relation to body size
  • longer and larger bones for greater leverage and a better framework for muscle mass
  • greater muscle mass in relation to body weight
  • higher proportion of fast-twitch muscle cells

These are advantages that all boys share over girls. Yes, at younger ages, girls often overcome them for various reasons, but the fastest boys will always be faster than the fastest girls.

My daughter and her swimming friends often lamented the unfairness represented by David, but at least they had the consolation of not being forced to compete against him (and then share a locker room with him!).  How tragic it is that these girls in Connecticut don’t have that consolation.

I’ve written about this topic before.

 

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I will not cede the moral high ground to people who looked the other way

Here’s what Patty Murray had to say about serial sex predator and killer of Mary Jo Kopechne, Ted Kennedy upon his death:

When I was young Ted Kennedy was larger than life. I could not believe it when I first walked out on the floor of the Senate and he walked over to welcome me. From that day on, he became a valued friend, a courageous partner, and a personal mentor.

From my earliest memories in the Senate when I watched him patiently and passionately argue to pass the Family and Medical Leave Act, to his last moments when he led the charge to pass legislation that guaranteed equal pay for women and encouraged Americans to serve and give back to their country as he did, Ted never once stopped fighting for those who couldn’t fight for themselves. [Unless, perhaps, they were drowning in his submerged vehicle] The country is indeed a better place because of him.

His loss is very personal to me. I will miss him. Our country will miss him.

I’m sure Mary Jo Kopechne’s family misses her, too, but, you know, acceptable losses.

And here’s what Murray had to say during the Senate impeachment hearings for Bill Clinton:

This President’s behavior was reprehensible, but it does not threaten our nation. In the past year, despite the scandal that ran on the front page nearly every day, our country has prospered. Our economy is growing. Our waters and air are cleaner. Our communities are safer. Our education system is stronger. America is not poised on the brink of disaster. Our democracy is safe.

I wonder if Roy Moore’s actions from 40 years ago threaten our nation.

And here’s what Claire McCaskill said about Ted Kennedy:

This man was so much more than his image. While his vision soared, the power of his personality and the magnet of his intellect drew his colleagues to the table of compromise. It was there he did his best work. His love for the little guy and his affection for the underdog influenced everything he did. [Ah, yes…the little guy. And gal. Especially waitresses.] And importantly, his sense of humor and contagious laughter made him real and approachable in spite of his power and privilege.

Mmm-hmmm…I’m sure Carla Gaviglio thinks about his infectious laughter every time she remembers the “waitress sandwich” prank. Hilarious!

Let me clarify something right here. I am not defending or excusing any past behavior on the part of Judge Roy Moore.

But.

Patty Murray and Claire McCaskill, who gave Ted Kennedy a pass on a lifetime of predation, are going to have a say in whether or not Roy Moore will be seated in the Senate, should he win election.

It will be interesting to see what, if anything, they have to say. I, for one, am not looking forward to being lectured to, from their supposed moral high ground, on the moral moral implications of seating Roy Moore from women who gave Ted Kennedy and/or Bill Clinton a pass on a lifetime of sexual predation.

H/T American Thinker

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It’s Always Unfair to Allow Boys to Compete Against Girls

No matter how they identify.

There. I’ve said it. Even though this insane article from USA Today, declares “everyone agrees” that Andraya Yearwood was properly allowed to compete as a girl, I stand in dissent. As the mother of three daughters and having previously been married to an age-group and high school swim coach, I know that allowing boys to compete in girls’ events can never be fair.

Rational people know this instinctively, which is why separate boys and girls teams exist in the first place. Starting at the youngest age levels, the fastest boys will always be faster than the fastest girls due to a number of physiological factors. These include:

  • a larger heart and lungs in relation to body size
  • longer and larger bones for greater leverage and a better framework for muscle mass
  • greater muscle mass in relation to body weight
  • higher proportion of fast-twitch muscle cells

Many of these changes will be unaffected, or minimally affected, by hormone therapy, but in this case, the athlete had not even begun treatment. He competed with the full benefit of every advantage a biological male possesses over a biological female.

This Daily Caller article notes that had Andraya competed as a boy, he would have finished in last place. That doesn’t really tell the whole story, or paint a complete picture as to just exactly how much of an advantage males have over females. Consider this: Andraya’s winning time in the 100m dash was over a second slower than the boy’s qualifying time of 11.5. In other words, if he had chosen to compete as a boy during the regular season, he likely would not even have qualified to participate in the state championships, but by competing as a girl, he was able to win two events.

This is reality. A run-of-the-mill high school male athlete can beat the best of the girls.

At the highest levels of competition in sports like track and swimming, women’s records lag behind men’s by about 10%. This differential has remained constant for decades.  It doesn’t mean that female athletes are competing at a lower level of excellence than male athletes, only that there are real physiological differences between men and women, boys and girls.

Allowing boys to compete in girls’ events, as I said above, can never be fair. Not only are girls being forced to compete against boys, they’re required to like it, then shower with the boys who stole their righteous rewards at the end of the day.

UPDATE: This madness must be stopped. Our girls deserve it.

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Important Information No Self-Respecting Person Should Be Without

The chronological order of the Derinyi novels by Katherine Kurtz.

  • Camber of Culdi
  • Saint Camber
  • Camber the Heretic
  • The Harrowing of Gwynedd
  • King Javan’s Year
  • The Bastard Prince
  • Deryni Tales
  • The Childe Morgan
  • The King’s Deryni
  • Deryni Rising
  • Deryni Checkmate
  • High Deryni
  • The Bishop’s Heir
  • The King’s Justice
  • The Quest for Saint Camber
  • King Kelson’s Bride

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Open Letter to State Senator Guy Palumbo

Dear Senator Palumbo:

I see you have introduced legislation for a new carbon tax. I find this disturbing but unsurprising.

Leaving aside the question of whether or not a tax on carbon is justified or beneficial, I wonder if there is an upper limit on the amount of money you think is fair to confiscate from Washington residents. I’ve posed this question to you numerous times on Twitter, but, having received no response, am asking again: How much of a person’s labor do you think the government is entitled to? One third? One half? Three quarters?

I realize this may sound like a trick question, but I think it’s fair and should be asked of every elected official. If you don’t have an upper limit in mind, how do you know when citizens have been taxed enough? And if you do have one in mind, don’t you think your constituents are entitled to know where it’s set?

Every tax is ultimately paid by individual taxpayers, whether it’s a direct tax such as sales or property tax, or indirect, such as the B&O tax. Your proposed carbon tax is no different.

I would appreciate a response.

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